WHO Poll
Q: 2019/20 With seven games to go will West Ham stay up
a. Our demise was sealed when the idiots on the Board appointed Moyes, we're down
28%
  
b. Despite the efforts of Moyes and the players, we will stay up by the smallest of margins
45%
  
c. I'm beyond caring & couldn't give two hoots either way
26%
  



claretandbluedagger 12:48 Fri May 15
Times article on Bobby Moore being accused of theft and the 1970 World cup
Interesting read in the Times, I wasn't particularly familiar with this whole story which took place about 25 years before I was born. Seems like he was stitched up by the Colombians, but perhaps some of you will remember more about this...

https://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/5aedd1e6-95f5-11ea-b833-0d83599da676

Among the reruns of classic matches during lockdown, the most glaring omission has surely been the mighty collision between England and Brazil at the 1970 World Cup under the hot sun of Guadalajara, Mexico. It was a tumultuous contest pitching Europe against South America; reigning world champions against one of the greatest sides of all time; perhaps the world’s best defensive team against an explosively potent attack; Bobby Moore against Pelé, Jairzinho, Tostão, Rivellino and Paulo Cézar, seemingly single-handedly at times.

“There was never any possibility it could be mundane,” the late, great Hugh McIlvanney wrote of a match that felt like one of the great heavyweight prize fights even if, as a group game, there could never be a knock-out. “A match for adults,” Mário Zagallo, the Brazil manager, said. From Gordon Banks’ save to Jeff Astle’s miss, it is an encounter that grips even now.

Even in a 1-0 defeat, and with some culpability for Brazil’s goal, Moore would emerge with his reputation never higher and that was not just because of what he did on the pitch to marshal England’s stretched defence or that tackle to halt Jairzinho, like Superman stopping a runaway train, or the iconic photo of sportsmanship at the end when he exchanged shirts with Pelé in mutual respect and friendship.

It was what Moore had gone through in the build-up, and still hung over him as he went out for this ultimate test of skills. Fifty years ago almost to the day, an assistant in a jewellery shop in Bogotá pointed at Moore to accuse him of theft and triggered the most extraordinary of pre-tournament scandals (and the England team has known a few) that dragged the revered captain into a courtroom, to house arrest and to fear the worst. “My whole career stood to be ruined,” Moore said.

This was an incident that led Foreign Office officials to warn that it could harm trade deals between England and Colombia, required the prime minister to intervene, and made headlines around the world given the stature of the accused. And it still carries an air of unresolved mystery even now.

All these decades later, no one even knows if there was a bracelet in the Fuego Verde shop on May 18, 1970, at about 4pm, when Moore ambled in there to browse with Bobby Charlton. We know that the owner, prompted by the assistant, Clara Padilla, accused Moore of pinching one as the squad loitered yards away in the lobby of the Tequendama Hotel. Moore steal a bracelet? Alf Ramsey regarded the accusation with contempt; his captain with bafflement.

The expectation among the squad was that a bizarre episode would fizzle out. England flew off to face Ecuador in a friendly. The mistake was coming back through Bogotá en route to Mexico. Waiting at the airport in Colombia were detectives with a warrant for Moore’s arrest.

It is hard to imagine the strain and confusion as Moore was taken away for what he assumed would be brief questioning. Instead he found himself facing a magistrate, listening to a babble of Spanish as British diplomats scrambled to find a lawyer.

By the time the hearing was over hours later, Ramsey and the rest of his squad were flying north. Moore was facing detention for a minimum of five days while the magistrate decided if there was evidence to go to full trial.

Moore’s famous sangfroid was being tested like never before, stuck under house arrest with two detectives following his every move. As McIlvanney noted, the England captain was facing “an ordeal that had sufficient echoes of Graham Greene if not Kafka to push an ordinary man towards hysteria”. Moore was never easily ruffled but he feared for his reputation and his chances of avoiding prison.

Writing a biography of Moore, no tale was more complex despite the assistance of the Colombian ambassador, a private investigator who tried to locate Padilla in the United States and a freelance journalist in Bogotá who spent weeks unearthing judicial files.

From UK government archives, Colombian secret service believed in Moore’s innocence from initial investigations. So did most of the world. It was not unheard of for wealthy or famous visitors to be targeted by criminals and scammers. But a street trader had been recruited as a new witness — it would only be revealed months later that he had been given money by the shop owner — so there were now two accusers. Moore had to re-enact the ‘crime scene’, to return to court.

The secretary of the FA sent an urgent message to Harold Wilson, the prime minister, warning that “every minute’s delay in securing Moore’s release militates against England’s World Cup chances”. Representations were made as high as the Colombian president.

It was only four days before the tournament that political pressure told and Moore was granted conditional release. Unshaven publicly for perhaps the only time in his life, he flew on to Mexico to prepare to lead England’s defence. Among the conflicted emotions, he felt badly let down by Ramsey for leaving him behind.

Despite the captain’s best efforts, it would turn out to be Brazil’s summer. England threw away a lead against West Germany in the quarter-finals to mark the beginning of the end of the Ramsey era. For Moore, the episode was a stark lesson that fame came at a price. A cloud hung over him. In August 1970, a panel of Colombian judges voted to rearrest Moore. In December, he and Charlton had to report to Bow Street magistrates to give fresh statements.

When he returned to the First Division with West Ham United, he would hear opposing fans singing “We know you’ve got the bracelet, we know you’ve got the bracelet . . .”

Alternative versions of the incident have circulated; that there was a third player who did pinch something, perhaps a prank gone wrong. Astle and Peter Osgood have been mentioned. There are those who like to say they know the real story. “A load of old bollocks,” Sir Geoff Hurst told me in response to conspiracy theories. Alan Ball once joked that “maybe it was Lee Harvey Oswald”.

What is beyond dispute is that no one could believe that Moore had pinched anything. He was no angel, but he was certainly not reckless. But even knowing he was innocent, it was an incident that pained him. He hated public embarrassment. He did not like to discuss it though, actually, it was an episode that helped to enhance his standing among his admirers.

If it had gone to trial, he would never have been short of character witnesses. Pelé said that day in Mexico confirmed Moore as the best defender he had faced. Hurst told me he thought that, even more than a historic afternoon in 1966, facing Brazil was the skipper’s finest performance for England.

“Of the supreme sports performers I have seen in action, perhaps only Muhammad Ali was a more conspicuous example of grace under pressure,” McIlvanney concluded.

We can only imagine how others would have reacted to the strain of being falsely accused; we can stick on a tape and see Moore’s response, and it oozes class.

Replies - Newest Posts First (Show In Chronological Order)

HairyHammer 7:50 Fri May 15
Re: Times article on Bobby Moore being accused of theft and the 1970 World cup
As the saying goes if you tell a lie big enough people will believe it.
I am not saying Moore was a saint but it makes absolutely no sense and is very out of character, who the fuck is going to steal anything with all his team mates lingering around in a foreign country with the worlds media and even worse Alf Ramsey on your heels. it just sounds and feels like a set up to me.
Bobby Moore will always be remembered for being a 100% down to earth GENT and a brilliant balletic footballer who happened to be the Captain of a world cup winning team his character to anyone who met him flawless, FULL STOP

Far Cough 7:06 Fri May 15
Re: Times article on Bobby Moore being accused of theft and the 1970 World cup
It was definitely Peter Crouch

boleynkid 6:23 Fri May 15
Re: Times article on Bobby Moore being accused of theft and the 1970 World cup
From an article in The Guardian

But the newly released Foreign Office files reveal what Moore and Charlton told the Colombian authorities when they were specifically asked to name the third man who had been with them in the Fuego Verde jewellery shop in the lobby of the Hotel Tequendama, Bogota, where the England team were staying.

The reply given in an unsworn statement by Bobby Moore was less than categorical: "There were quite a few members of the English football team in the foyer of the hotel and when Mr Charlton and I entered the jewellers' shop it may have been possible that other members of the team were round the door of the shop.

"As far as I know no other member of the team entered the shop but I had my back to the door the whole time. I don't know the name of any third party present and cannot confirm anything with regard to a third person," he said in a formal statement given to Bow Street magistrates in London in December 1970, after a further request from the Colombian authorities months after his release from detention.

The Colombians also asked Bobby Charlton "to state, if he can remember, the name of the other player of the English football team who accompanied them on the evening of the incident" and anybody else apart from the sales girl, Clara Padilla, who had been in the shop.

Bobby Charlton explained that the majority of England players had been having a look round the shops in the hotel after they had a meal: "I was thinking about getting a ring for my wife ...

"I saw a ring on display inside the shop, it didn't have a price on it so we decided to go in and what it cost ... The young woman took the ring out of the cabinet and brought it round to us, she had taken it out having first opened a glass door. We discussed the price, or I should say we worked it out, and found that it was too expensive so we left ... We had been in the shop five minutes at most. I certainly did not see a bracelet encrusted with diamonds and emeralds as such a striking item would have caused us some interest."

The file also shows that during the investigation Colombian security police measured the size of Bobby Moore's fist to see if it could have fitted through the hole in the glass cabinet the bracelet was stolen from. It was too big.

wd40 5:45 Fri May 15
Re: Times article on Bobby Moore being accused of theft and the 1970 World cup
Not the same subject but same time ,Moore's shirt which he wore against Brazil is in the football museum in Manchester (well it was a couple of years ago).
Tucked away in a cabinet in a corner which you could easy miss. Pissed me right off seeing it after passing so many pointless shirts on full displayed and in your face .

Dan M 4:49 Fri May 15
Re: Times article on Bobby Moore being accused of theft and the 1970 World cup
I was told it was a prank by Geoff Astle that escalated, so much so he never owned up to it. But as I can't remember who told me this I think it's inadmissible.

Far Cough 4:31 Fri May 15
Re: Times article on Bobby Moore being accused of theft and the 1970 World cup
Was that story told with the car window down?

WHU(Exeter) 4:18 Fri May 15
Re: Times article on Bobby Moore being accused of theft and the 1970 World cup
I think just as interesting is Harry Redknapp's claim that he was there when Bobby Moore decided not to watch anymore games from the West Stand and had an argument with the club secretary (or Chairman).

The timeline given by Redknapp was just after he had got back from the States - he even remembers the seat block area, although it's telling that has changed in between interviews - my guess is that the first seat block quoted didn't actually exist.

Harry saw quite a few games with Bobby 'then', so it meant he was right next beside him when the incident occurred and all makes for good reading for interviews and biographies.

except...the time suggested by Redknapp was when Bobby Moore was manager of Oxford City, so probably best left to Harry to explain how Bobby Moore was juggling managing a football club on a Saturday, whilst also turning up regularly at the Boleyn...

Still...makes a good yarn...

Eerie Descent 3:42 Fri May 15
Re: Times article on Bobby Moore being accused of theft and the 1970 World cup
MancIron 3:34 Fri May 15

Are you calling out Sold0 as a liar?

Far Cough 3:37 Fri May 15
Re: Times article on Bobby Moore being accused of theft and the 1970 World cup
MancIron, shirley not?

Probably the youngest player in that squad

MancIron 3:34 Fri May 15
Re: Times article on Bobby Moore being accused of theft and the 1970 World cup
One word. Kiddo.

ParadiseLost 3:28 Fri May 15
Re: Times article on Bobby Moore being accused of theft and the 1970 World cup
Huge hotel, still there and probably hasn’t changed much over the years. Still has the arcade of small jewelry and emerald shops. The business center of the city has moved north so these days its popular with Colombian government employees in the capital for business. Recently was included in Netflix’s Narcos series (the end of the second series)
reflecting real life as Escobar stayed there with his family.

Northern Sold 3:06 Fri May 15
Re: Times article on Bobby Moore being accused of theft and the 1970 World cup
cygnet 1:35 Fri May 15

Other people knew... like his son for instance... his son who was the landlord at our local for a few years... his son who loved a story about his old man... especially when there was lock ins galore at said son's local boozer....

Sven has it spot on ... all will be revealed when the comb over king pops his clogs...

Far Cough 1:35 Fri May 15
Re: Times article on Bobby Moore being accused of theft and the 1970 World cup
I doubt Bobby could have bough the place outright, remember back then, they weren't getting the kind of eye watering sums that today's players get, don't get me wrong, he and many others of his standing weren't short of a few bob so maybe he could have got a mortgage on the place

cygnet 1:35 Fri May 15
Re: Times article on Bobby Moore being accused of theft and the 1970 World cup
Bobby Moore told one person what happened. Jeff Powell. The only hint Powell has ever given is it was one of the younger members of the squad.

boleynkid 1:26 Fri May 15
Re: Times article on Bobby Moore being accused of theft and the 1970 World cup
I once spoke to Alan Mullery about this. I think he may have even been there at the time but he said it was obviously a complete stitch up and added Bobby could have bought the place if he wanted.

Sven Roeder 1:10 Fri May 15
Re: Times article on Bobby Moore being accused of theft and the 1970 World cup
The sort of thing you might see the truth revealed when the perpetrators are dead.
Of those mentioned Moore, Astle and Osgood are all dead and no revelation.
Bobby Charlton still attends Man U games with his extravagantly bejewelled wife
She wore a tiara picked up at his investiture at Buckingham Palace at Man U’s last home game

Northern Sold 12:54 Fri May 15
Re: Times article on Bobby Moore being accused of theft and the 1970 World cup
B _ B _ Y _ H _ R _ T _ N

Nagel 12:52 Fri May 15
Re: Times article on Bobby Moore being accused of theft and the 1970 World cup
Are you using Firefox? Seem to remember that happened to me before switching to Chrome.

claretandbluedagger 12:49 Fri May 15
Re: Times article on Bobby Moore being accused of theft and the 1970 World cup
And naturally, the website can't handle apostrophes or letters with accents...





Copyright 2006 WHO.NET | Powered by: